History and Culture of Tuscany

More about ‘History and Culture of Tuscany’

Tuscan Saffron

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Saffron is grown in small quantities but high quality in Italy where it is used in a number of regional dishes, most famously Risotto alla Milanese. The prized “Aquila” saffron (zafferano dell’Aquila) is characterised by elevated safranal and crocin content, shape, unusually pungent aroma and intense colour.[…]

Badia a Coltibuono

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Badia a Coltibuono was founded in 1051 by monks of the Benedictine Vallombrosan Order who also began planting the first vineyards in the Upper Chianti area. In 1810, when Tuscany was under Napoleonic rule, the monks were forced to leave Coltibuono and the monastery was deconsecrated and, after passing through a number of hands, was bought by the Stucchi-Prinetti family.[…]

Villa Corsini

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Villa Corsini a Mezzomonte near Impruneta is one of three villas in Italy bearing the name Corsini. There is the former Villa Corsini “dei Quattro Venti” in Rome, destroyed during the Garibaldian uprising and now incorporated into the grounds of Villa Doria Pamphili. […]

Badia a Passignano

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Badia a Passignano. According to tradition, a monastery was founded at Passignano by Sichelmo in 890. An Abbey (Badia) was established 1049 as a consequence of the Vallombrosan monastic reforms, and took the form of a quadrangular fortified structure with corner towers. […]

Fiesole

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Fiesole is actually an older settlement than Florence but was long ago overtaken by its former rival in the Val d’Arno below. For centuries Fiesole has been the favoured retreat of Florentines during the hot summer months and it still provides cool summer air and magnificent views. […]

Montelupo Fiorentino

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Montelupo Fiorentino is historically and also today one of the most famous centres of painted majolica and ceramics production in Tuscany, and is within easy reach of Florence. […]

Populonia

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Populonia is the location of some of the best-preserved Etruscan tomb structures and other remains in Tuscany, plus a small Etruscan museum. It was an important metalworking city for the Etruscans and one of the few of their cities built right on the coast. […]

Sienna

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Sienna (Siena in Italian) is second only to Florence as a Tuscan “art” town, and, for many, its much smaller size and the absence of traffic in the historical centre make it more than the equal of Florence as a place to enjoy the treasures of Romanesque and Renaissance Italy, as well as the modern Italian lifestyle. […]

Films shot in Tuscany

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Tuscany had already begun to appear in films at the beginning of the 1900s. Among the better known movies featuring or filmed in Tuscany are: Romola (Henry King, 1924), a silent movie based on the novel by George Elliot and set in Florence in the 1500s, starring Lillian and Dorothy Gish.[…]